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Church at the Lake
First United Church of Christ - Marblehead, Ohio 
First UCC
802 Prairie St.
Marblehead, OH 43440
419.798.4612
Pastor@churchatthelake.org

For real! You are welcome here! We are the Marblehead First United Church of Christ.  Lets get to know each other,  worship, and visit a bit over a cup of coffee.  Or

write us a note now! .

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Serving since the1870's
Check out our History.
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Choir practice begins a few minutes after 9 a.m. Please feel free to come join us. We have a summer congregation and we think you will enjoy both the people and the music.

Nov 26, 2017

Welcome, visitors! Please sign the guest register with your name and address so your presence can be acknowledged. Everyone is invited to stay for coffee.

 

Truth is! Giving through the church insures more money gets where you want it. You can give through the church or online through Neighbors in Need. The special church-wide offering was October 1, but you can give still if you want.  Don't hold back. Tragedy is still striking, beaconing us to respond.

 
  • Handicap accessible restrooms are located in the basement. Elevator is available.

  • If you are willing to volunteer (on a regular or irregular basis) to count the collection money, make deposits, keep track of pledges, and occasionally write checks, contact Lorrie Halblaub at 419-798-4132 or halblaubl@gmail.com by Oct. 8th.

  • Thank you to all who pledged last week and/or those who support the church in any way.

  • December food/gift donations will be to Holiday Bureau rather than the Danbury Food Pantry. See your insert.

  • November 26, Sunday. You are invited to help decorate the church for Christmas after our worship service.

LOCAL COMMUNITY

Ecumenical Thanksgiving service will be held Monday, November 20, at 6:30 at St. Mary Byzantine Church.

Thursdays, 7 p.m. at St. John Lutheran, 117 Stone St., Marblehead. Al-anon meeting is open to anyone whose life is affected by addiction of a loved one. Any questions, please contact Jane at 419-341-1525.


ONGOING LOCAL

  • We are still recycling aluminum—cans, pots, pans, storm doors—and gas grills. All money goes to church repairs. Please call Wally Grinnell with any questions at 440-382-2833.

  • Church Office Phone 419-798-4612 Home Phone (419) Email: mooneyfarm@cros.net. You are welcome to call Rev. Kay at the church or at 333-0433 home anytime.



 

OUR CONGREGATION’S MISSION STATEMENT

The avowed purpose of this church shall be to worship God, to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and to celebrate the sacraments; to realize Christian fellowship and the unity within this church and the church universal; to render loving service toward humankind; and to strive for righteousness, justice and peace.

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We extend a special welcome to visitors! We have a regular congregation of the faithful, while we welcome vacationers, tourists, summer people, or new or old residents are invited to come to worship any and all Sundays.
                   We have a traditional worship service in a beautiful, historic building, where God is still speaking and ALL are welcome! Just come any Sunday morning at 10:30. Communion on the second Sunday of each month (first Sunday in October) is open to all Christians. Coffee hour follows every worship service.

We have more people in the summer than the winter because we have a lot of pleople spend their vacations here, then they join us for worship.

      You can expect traditional Protestant worship. During worship, at the time of prayers, you may hear members expessing their request for prayers. You may say something or not as you choose.

      We sing three hymns and hear a good and timely message. This is a church that expects the exposition of the Word to be applied to the condition of the world.
Lectionary Selection: Matthew 25:31-46

If you're seeking an answer to that difficult question, Barbara Brown Taylor shares your concern, for "the Bible," as she says, "is not a book with the answers in the back" (The Preaching Life). But we can wrestle with this text because we have a bedrock, foundational belief, a deep trust in the goodness of God, in the grace of God. We trust that we can listen for how the still-speaking God calls us to participate in the unfolding of the reign of God, and to do so in freedom, but a freedom that comes with responsibility. Such freedom brings joy, but the responsibility calls for serious, shared reflection on God's call and claim on our lives.

When I joined a United Church of Christ congregation years ago, the words, "freedom with responsibility," planted themselves deep in my heart. The "with responsibility" part reflects the reality that we live in community, not completely on our own. We are not, despite our brashest claims, truly self-sufficient. And the "freedom" part says that we can choose to participate in that community, or choose to do nothing, to stand on the sidelines of life. We can choose not to answer God's call. But doesn't this story tell us what will happen in the end?

Unconventional sinners

And that gets to the heart of what the "goats" in this story did, in response to God's call: nothing. They weren't "sinners" in the conventional sense of doing bad things, like sexual offenses or stealing or even murder. They just didn't do anything when they saw their sisters and brothers suffering.

As Jesus describes this apocalyptic scene, a huge, dramatic event with all the nations, and all the angels, and the Son of Man coming in glory and sitting on a throne, we might say that he draws our focus not up, at all this glory, but down, on the very thing, the down-to-earth thing, that he did throughout his teaching ministry: he noticed people in their need, and he responded. In this spiritual practice, Jesus was a good and faithful Jew, observing the tradition and laws of his faith, which provided for the care of those who were suffering or in need.